3 Tips to Become a Better Large Group Training Coach IMMEDIATELY

Over the past year, I’ve really been focusing on team development and trying to help the coaches at our gym continue to get better. I have no idea how many new coaches and interns I’ve helped coach up, but I can definitely say that it’s more than I can count on my fingers and toes. During our internship and new hire process, I always work on having new coaches work on three things specifically. These three things can be done by anybody, and they can be done immediately. You don’t have to get smarter, learn anything about form and technique, or take any time whatsoever to implement these three tips, and if you do…you’ll immediately become a better, more inspiring coach.

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  1. Project Your Voice – If you’re reading this article, I’m pretty confident you know exactly what I’m talking about. Whether you’re in the position to be training new coaches, or you simply think back to your first 10-20 group sessions you’ve ever coached, being quiet and timid is pretty darn common…especially if you’re having your supervisor or mentor sitting in the back scrutinizing your every move.

 

Being able to project your voice not only helps improve communication during the session, it also helps give the coach a sense of confidence that is noticeable to the clients. I’ve been coaching groups for a long time now, and being loud has become second nature. After you start to practice vocalizing and projecting your voice, the group sessions will have a new sense of energy, and the clients will know they have a leader helping guide the way. I can’t stress the importance of this. Get loud or get out! If you can’t project your voice, you won’t cut it at our gym. If being loud terrifies you, I’d recommend sticking to personal training.

 

  1. Be Conscious of Your Body Language – Believe it or not, what you say while coaching doesn’t matter all that much. The actual words that flap out of your jaw while rambling during the session aren’t even comprehended by a vast majority of the people that are training hard. Communication consists of three main components: body language, tone of voice, and actual spoken words.

 

The words you actually say during any conversation only account for 7% of how the message will be interpreted. I’m willing to go out on a limb and guesstimate that percentage is less than 5% if you’re in the middle of a training session. The other 93% come from body language and tone of voice. 93%!!! Body language makes up 55% and tone of voice helps make up the remaining 38%. If you’re playing by the numbers, improving body language should be of the upmost importance. If you can enhance your body language and project your voice, you’ve just became a much more effective communicator and coach. Don’t put your hands in your pockets. Don’t cross your arms while coaching or talking to clients. This is a very closed off position and not very welcoming. Smile regularly. Use hand gestures and be a little animated. These are only a few things I want to see from all of our coaches. Work on body language and improve your skills in coaching with very little effort.

 

  1. Minimize the Quiet Time – Nothing kills the environment in a group training session more than quiet time. If the coach isn’t being loud or they’re not saying much throughout, the energy in the room can drop immediately. That cannot happen under any circumstance. A major component of the group-training environment is the high energy and competitiveness it provides. If the coach is continuously talking and making him/herself recognized, the session simply has more value. Your clients will work harder, the environment is just more fun, and your business will start to grow.

 

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Remember the percentages from above. It’s not really about what you say…it’s more about HOW you say it. I constantly talk throughout each session. If I’m not specifically coaching a client one-on-one for a brief period of time, I’m constantly saying something. So, I’m either fixing form or speaking to the group the entire time. The only time I shut the hell up is when I’m personally coaching somebody. It’s not really cool to yell in someone’s face, so I hold that for when I’m moving between stations and clients that need the adjustments.

 

If you have the systems in place to make a group training session that is replicable, understanding these three things will help you put out a better product, or session. If you’re using the Smart Group Training System currently, you should know exactly what I’m talking about. The SGT System has helped us put together an amazing training program that any new coach or intern can start to have major success with., very quickly. Even with our high standards, we’re able to put together pretty solid coaches within 5-6 weeks. The system takes care of the workout, so our new coaches need to learn how to run the system, which is extremely easy, and learn these three tips above.

 

If you haven’t checked out The Smart Group Training System, be sure to grab a copy today. The system we’ve created over the past 5 years has helped us tremendously and I’m confident it will help you as well. Check out the SGT System today!

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